The New Situationists:
Here Guy Debord’s great text ‘The Society of The Spectacle’ resists police attacks.

The New Situationists:

Here Guy Debord’s great text ‘The Society of The Spectacle’ resists police attacks.

The ABC of Revolution

A. The object of sabotage and misappropriation, whether practiced by the individual or the group, is the unleashing of a wildcat strike.

B. Every wildcat strike must develop into a factory occupation.

C. Every factory occupied must be appropriated and turned promptly to the service of revolutionaries.

D. By choosing delegates (who are subject to instant recall and mandated to collate decisions and to oversee their implementation) the assembled strikers lay the groundwork for a radical reorganization of society… into a society of universal self-management.

Raoul Vaneigem, Situationist International. Source 1. Source 2.

Yes, Debord and The Society of the Spectacle is difficult reading indeed. Try Raoul Vaneigem “The Revolution of Everyday Life" instead.
lukesimcoe:

The above image is the famous cover photo of Guy Debord’s The Society of the Spectacle. I just read it for my political economy class, along with some commentary by Giorgio Agamben.
Maybe I’m frustrated by it, or maybe I’m intellectually exhausted by the volume of reading for this class, but I didn’t find either of the readings to be all that insightful. Debord regularly denounced translated versions of his opus, but nonetheless, it comes across as sometimes vapid and often pretentious — not unlike a typical issue of Adbusters, who base their approach to criticism on Debord’s strategy of detournement.
The book makes all kind of poetic and sweeping statements, but it mostly seems as if Debord just borrowed existing concepts from critical theory and lumped them all together under the banner of ‘spectacle.’ The word itself is used to mean just about anything, such that it becomes an empty vessel for whatever the turtleneck and beret-clad Situationists felt like whining about at the moment.
Not to keep flogging a dead horse, but The Society of the Spectacle is kind of like critical theory written by and for hipsters (EDIT: Yes, I am aware that the hipster phenomenon is exactly the kind of thing Debord was critiquing). Quoting from it might get you laid, but it’s certainly not doing much to further the revolution.

Yes, Debord and The Society of the Spectacle is difficult reading indeed. Try Raoul VaneigemThe Revolution of Everyday Life" instead.

lukesimcoe:

The above image is the famous cover photo of Guy Debord’s The Society of the Spectacle. I just read it for my political economy class, along with some commentary by Giorgio Agamben.

Maybe I’m frustrated by it, or maybe I’m intellectually exhausted by the volume of reading for this class, but I didn’t find either of the readings to be all that insightful. Debord regularly denounced translated versions of his opus, but nonetheless, it comes across as sometimes vapid and often pretentious — not unlike a typical issue of Adbusters, who base their approach to criticism on Debord’s strategy of detournement.

The book makes all kind of poetic and sweeping statements, but it mostly seems as if Debord just borrowed existing concepts from critical theory and lumped them all together under the banner of ‘spectacle.’ The word itself is used to mean just about anything, such that it becomes an empty vessel for whatever the turtleneck and beret-clad Situationists felt like whining about at the moment.

Not to keep flogging a dead horse, but The Society of the Spectacle is kind of like critical theory written by and for hipsters (EDIT: Yes, I am aware that the hipster phenomenon is exactly the kind of thing Debord was critiquing). Quoting from it might get you laid, but it’s certainly not doing much to further the revolution.

"Survival is budgeted life. The system of exploitation of nature and man, starting in the Middle Neolithic with intensive farming, caused an involution in which creativity—a quality specific to humans—was supplanted by work, by the production of a covetous power. Creative life, as had begun to unfold during the Paleolithic, declined and gave way to a brutish struggle for subsistence. From then on, predation, which defines animal behavior, became the generator of all economic mechanisms."

Raoul Vaneigem